What I read last month: August 2017

In What I Read Last Month, I recap the previous month’s reading and shamelessly copy and paste from my Goodreads reviews. You can read previous months’ What I Read… by clicking here. Disclaimer: Amazon links are affiliate links, but despite wanting to support writers by buying books, I get most of mine from the library.

August was a bear of a month. I was out of town for 16 of 31 days, stretched over three different trips. That’s a lot of time spent packing, unpacking, visiting, and traveling to and fro, not to mention my WDC17 prep and followup.

Despite the harried pace, I was lucky enough to find some great reads. I give mostly three-star Goodreads reviews, and August gave me two five-star books.

Here’s what I read:

Magazines

I read the summer issue of Tin House on the beach, starting with Daniel Wallace’s Sea Girls. I also polished off the previous issue, which included Leslie Jamison’s un-put-down-able essay about Amy Winehouse.

Catching up on a big stack of New Yorker short fiction, I found myself most transported by Will Mackin’s Crossing the River No Name and Curtis Sittenfeld’s Show Don’t Tell.

Books

The Unseen World

★★★★★

This is the rare book that I finish and think, “there’s nothing I would’ve done differently.”

The Unseen World is a clever, well-executed novel. The characters are compelling and their lives are set against a delightful backdrop.

There are some plot developments I anticipated (and was glad when they finally arrived), and some surprises that made for lovely Easter eggs at the end. I was about to call the ending too tidy, but the epilogue completely made up for it. Just like Moore’s previous book Heft, I recommend this to just about everyone.

World Made By Hand

★★

When I got around 85% of the way through this book, I realized it wasn’t all going to come together in a big bang at the end.

I’m going to spend some time chewing on this one, and considering why the author did these things the way he did.

In the meantime, I’ll say I enjoyed the setting and the world-building was good. This book reminded me why I think post-apocalyptic fiction is so neat. I love seeing writers ponder what humans would do if the world as we knew it came to an end.

The book could’ve used a little more resolution at the end, re: the different factions, how we should feel about them, and how they might work together (or not) going forward. We spent a lot of time learning about the various folks living around Union Grove, and sometimes I wondered to what end.

Perhaps the biggest issue for me was the female characters. I’m not sure why the end of the modern age resulted in all the women reverting to traditional gender roles. Many of the cult members came from the military, but they couldn’t have included any women who had formerly served in the military? There weren’t any gay people at all, or women who did something other than tend the home and support the men? I’d buy it if many, or even most, of the women did this. However, it would’ve been more believable to have a token woman vying for her rightful place within the town leadership. Or even a man who rejects the new (old) mountain-man lifestyle. As it was, the characters were too divided into types for a book released in 2008.

The Hate U Give

★★★★★

Every once in a while, I come across a book I want to read slowly, but can’t. The Hate U Give was one of those books. I knew I was cutting my time with these characters short by devouring it so quickly, but I couldn’t help myself.

From page one, the main character, Starr’s, voice is so on point and compelling. There’s no getting-to-know-you period, no slogging through act one to get to the action. I was hooked from the very beginning. The narrative sucked you straight into the world of the story, and I experienced everything vividly, right alongside the characters.

This is a really important book, and it’s pulled off superbly. I want to go tell everyone to read it. We need more books like it, to bring us out of the hashtags, the generalizations, the racist talking points around privileged white dinner tables.

I saw another reviewer criticize the character Hailey — a white friend of Starr’s who claims she isn’t racist, but reveals over time that she actually kind of is — as an unrealistic caricature. I wish that were true. The Haileys of the world grow up with no requirement to develop empathy or deep understanding of people who aren’t like them. Successful contemporary fiction like The Hate U Give could change that.

Though this book is billed as YA, it holds nothing back. So, buyer with a younger YA reader beware, and The Hate U Give is every bit as valuable and relevant to adults as it is to YA readers.

My only substantive criticism is that a few of the longer chunks of dialogue started to lose the voice. It’s easy to slip into a little monologue in service to the message and have it come out not quite how the character would say it. But, all things considered, this effect was mild, and offset by the excellent flow in most of the book’s dialogue.

All in all, The Hate U Give is an important and compelling read, and I highly recommend it to just about anyone.

Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World

★★★

This is such a fast read, you have no reason not to read it.

Unlike David Allen’s Getting Things Done or Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, this book won’t give you a full action plan to improve your life. It’s more like a compass to point you in the right direction.

Of course, given its length, the author really can’t get into detailed how-tos and action items. If you’re looking for that, go with a longer book like those I mentioned above.

However, this book gives a nice kick in the pants and a reminder of what’s important.

Other stuff

I also grabbed a copy of Samin Nosrat’s Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat from the library and I’m in love. The illustrations are delightful, and Nosrat’s tone and style make the subject matter super approachable. I’m not finished yet, but I already know I’ll need to buy it for my kitchen shelf. I’ve renewed it the maximum number of times and don’t feel I can go on without it in my life.

Enough about me. What are you reading? Shoot me your recommendations in the comments!

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